Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Welcome to Bay Haven Inc. Professional Development.

60 comments:

Pru said...

I loved the second video about schools killing creativity. I was thinking that this applies to teachers as well. I think it advocates for embracing the use of spontaneous creativity by teachers after an "aha" moment during teaching. The use of scripted instructional plans created by other teachers could be a killer. I came up with some of my best lessons/units during my first few years of teaching when I was "winging it". I am thankful now that I had the freedom to work through the highest levels of the Hess Rigor Matrix to develop my creative teaching ideas. I still use the best ones today, and feel passionate about them because I "gave birth" to them myself.
Pru

Trish said...

someone had to be the first for the "Best Practices" we now use. I believe in the ability of our teachers to develop the next "Best Practices".

tiernsr said...

Kids always need to be creative!

henryjl said...

I found it interesting in the video that in order to be successful as an adult we need to work at a level 4-5 but our FCA test at a 1-2. I feel the same that students must master level 1-2 before going on to level 3-5. I feel that K12 is where we master levels 1-2 and introduce 3-5 as developmentally appropriate.

Brittany B said...

I believe it is important to allow students to think outside of the box and encourage them to work with others. I learn so much from my colleagues and the same is true for students.

Penny Kent said...

I really enjoyed the video. Of course, we want our own children to be independent; however, the tests they take are only at levels 1 and 2. I strongly believe that students need to master levels 1 and 2 before moving to a higher level. If students have mastered those levels then it's our job to take them where they need to be.

LaurenD said...

Very intriguing! The piece that got my mind jogging the most is having students organized by their manufactured date. I can see that student work groups organized in a different way can be highly effective. This plays into the mentor/trainee mentality when peers help peers. I would like to learn more about ideas to promote multigrade collaborative groups.

BeckyS said...

I agree with Jennifer and Penny. I believe that K-2 teachers need to introduce higher level questions, but we need to make sure that our students have a strong foundation and have mastered levels 1 & 2. Thinking outside the box is much easier for some children then others.

Anonymous said...

From Christie B:
I enjoyed both videos. They really had me thinking about children and their ability or really lack of being independent thinkers. I believe my generation was much better at being independent thinkers. We were able to go outside and create silly games or build forts with no direction or parameters set (except for safety issues). From this, it had me thinking if I am squelching my students ability to be creative and/or independent by putting parameters on them in their activities. I know that I ask higher level questions but by setting parameters on some of their activities am I just defeating what I want to develop. HMMMM??? I am going to do some self-assessment and see what I come up with.

Britney D. said...

I found it interesting when the video mentioned that educators often find doing what they did in the past works with students of today which is not true. Students do not think the same as they did years ago. There are many factors, including life experiences, that have changed the way students think critically and solve real world problems.

Lindsey S. said...

I really enjoyed the videos. I agree that children need to master levels 1 & 2 then advance to levels 3 & 4. If not, they won't have the chance to think on that level.

Katie L. said...

I enjoyed watching both videos. I, too, agree with the above comments. Students need to be introduced to and have implemented into their learning higher level thinking, and creative thoughts based upon their individual learning needs. However, not all students can efficiently and effectively master higher level thinking if an appropriate foundation is not set in before trying to master this type of learning. Students do need to have their own sense of creativity in their learning. It is our job as teachers to help students reach their highest potential. This task is only done appropriately, if we know where our students need to start on an individual basis.

Anonymous said...

Joy C.
Many comments really hit home for me. *I have always said-- just because a student is 5 years old does not mean he is ready for kindergarten (especially boys). *I agree "boring" school must compete with all the "fun" technology sometimes. *I not only think we need to educate our students a different way than we did 20 years ago but I think we will have to get parents to buy into it as well.

Jennifer C. said...

Jennifer C.
What a profound video regarding our education system today! It really got 5th grade talking. I was really moved by the example of the paper clip segment and how kindergarteners can come up with so many more uses than older students. It does make you think about how we are 'killing creativity.' The flip side is we're stuck with testing that is very formula driven and at the lower levels like everyone has mentioned. It's a little mind blowing when you think how much the education system needs overhauling in terms of technology and reaching 21st century learners.

Brittany W. said...

The second video was great. In the 5th grade meeting I think we were all in agreement that we have to focus so much on the lower levels (that what our tests and curriculum are really focused on)and there just isn't enough time in the day to REALLY get into those higher levels.

Anonymous said...

Kindergarten met as a team to watch and discuss the Dagget video, since Sir Richard said we learn from being in a group and bouncing ideas off each other. We agree with Dagget: Use it or lose it. Our nation is fixated on regurgitation of knowledge instead of being able to apply their knowledge to real world applications. Our kindergartners have had their manufacturers/parents do things for them for so long that it is hard for us as teachers to get them to think and perform for themselves. There again we think maturity plays a significant role developing their knowledge to real world situations.
Bascetta Buffkin Crawford Hewett Reiser

Penny Kent said...

I agree with the above comments. It is hard to challenge those students who really need to be challenged because we are always so concerned about those ones who are struggling. Since our last session, I am constantly thinking about what level I'm teaching at. That's a win-win for everyone...me and the students:)

Page Nabywaniec said...

After reading the articles and watching both videos, especially the Daggett video, I have to say I agree with Daggett. Fostering independance is key. In recent years, I have observed that children are becoming more and more dependant on us. I believe this is an attitude that begins at home and is cultivated by parents; however, when the children come to school, is carries over into their education. We are producing a "spoon fed" society. Teaching children to think for themselves and solve "real world" problems and situations is a true challenge that we as teachers must begin to prepare for.

Page Nabywaniec said...

My brain must have been thinking faster than I could type correctly, pardon the errors (independence, not independance and dependent, not dependant.) Now I see where my daughter gets it from! Sorry!

Anonymous said...

I found both videos compelling. I agree with Dagget that we need to harbor independence with our students and not baby them. I can see a big difference in the group of students I have had in just my five years of teaching. Kids now are waiting for me to tell them the answers rather than thinking critically about how to find the answer on any topic. I also agree with Sir Richard. I find it compelling that the standardized tests and the prescriptions being written for ADD/ADHD correlate with each other. There are many distractions in our world today. For example, when you go to a nice sit-down restaurant, all the people at the table are busy clicking on their smart phones instead of focusing in on the social relationshiops in front of them. With our need to be constantly "in the know" we have distorted our sense of family time and real relationships.

R.Smith

Brittany Buschmann said...

I found the Dagget video very interesting. I agree that as teachers we need to challenge all students to think at a higher level and become independent learners. I strive to guide my students into discovering something new. The challenge for me is knowing when and where to step back and giving the right amount of guidance. The challenge to be independent does not apply only to the academics, but also with teaching responsibility for each child’s actions.

B. Sehlhorst said...

I agree with Daggett, that our children need to learn how to apply what they have been taught in the real world. We need to encourage them to be more independent thinkers, but that also needs to begin at home. I am amazed at the difference this year with my students, then in the previous years. The students are much quicker to tell me they can't and give up. I agree with Retessa. They want instant gratification. Daggett also mentioned that we are fixated on levels 1 & 2,because of our state tests. I agree with that. Teachers want their kids to do well, we teach what the curriculum tells us we must teach. Unfortunately, that is focusing on levels 1 & 2. Preparing our students for levels 4 & 5 will be a challenge.

Britney D. said...

I agree with Daggett and the above comments about encouraging our students to become more independent thinkers. I think students rely so much on other people to provide answers instead of trying to think or work out the problems themselves. I think as a teacher, this is something I am constantly working on. Sometimes I am unsure of how much assistance to provide the students. It is tough to sit back and let them think for themselves at times.

Lauren Davidson said...

I feel like much of this has already been said! During the video, I was really hit hard with the concept that students are "drugged up with medicine" in order to lull them into a condition where they are not being themselves, but instead behaving in a zombie-like nature. It really makes me wonder about some students who are being medicated to fit the mold and expectations of a school community. While it is not possible for an average school in today's society to function with that spectra of their personality...I would love to encounter a positive learning environment that fosters these personal differences. My mind cannot fathom such a place!

Lindsey S. said...

I agree with Becky and Retessa. I have many students who wait for me to give them the answer even if the answer is right there in front of them. It is a combination of being lazy an not having the right tools to find the answer or solve the problem. Like Page said, it is our responsibility to teach them to find answers and problem solve.

Jennifer H said...

The Sir Richard video really hit home with me because I have seen this with my own child. This is a child who has loved to write her whole life. After preparing for Fl writes, she has not written for fun or on her own at home. It is unfortunate that the curriculum has mostly been driven by standardized test. These tests have taken much of the creativity out of our classrooms because there is so much tied to these tests and there is a lot of pressure "to get the students ready" instead of fostering a love for learning. Many 'teachable' moments are not planned for. The students often drive these teachable moments with the questions they ask or topics they bring up. Our role as teachers is to teach but also foster a love of learning and to ask questions that get students excited about a topic so that they take on the responsibility of learning instead of just waiting for the answer.
Jennifer H

Kaci said...

I found the videos very interesting. I think it is very important to master the level 1-2 and then bring in the level 3-4 as the students are ready. This really makes them have to think outside the box and apply it to their own life/situations.

Ashley Mizell and Amy Martin said...

We both really enjoyed the contents of this video. One part in particular that stuck out was the overmedication of today's students. Children are being medicated too quickly. Some children fidget with desk items as a way to stimulate their thinking and it helps them to process the information. While others process quickly and can stay focused easily. This video really stressed that all individuals learn differently and at different rates and medication is not always the best option. It made us reflect on behaviors of our own students. As far as the levels of questioning, we reflected on our own lesson plans and teaching styles. While the foundations must be built, it is what we do after that foundation is built to make it concrete and relevant to students' daily lives. We really enjoyed this video! By: Ashley M. and Amy M.

Brooke said...
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Diane said...

Strategies used for gifted students include using hands-on and engaging activities to teach through the standards fosters divergent thinking. We need to implement some of these strategies for all students so that we don't limit creative thinking to only the lower grade students.

Eva said...

The second video was a sad look at the state of education in the United States. Unfortunately teaching to the lower quartile is affecting our success as a nation, not to mention how we are viewed by other countries.

SuzanneM said...

Very interesting video. I completely agree with what was said about how children don't all fit into one box. We have grouped students and categorized them based on their age and expect them to all learn the same things and, generally, at the same pace. Also, teachers are constantly, in many cases, fighting a losing battle due to the over-stimulation that they receive outside of school. Creativity must be a priority if we hope to ever have students who maintain interest in academics and become divergent thinkers.

Brooke said...

Oops! I had 1 or 2 errors in my previous post. Video 2 reinforces what several colleagues and I have been discussing for the past 3-4 years or so. Parents, Pediatricians, and Teachers (unfortunately) are way too quick to diagnose children with ADD/ADHD.

Molly said...

I found this video to be very challenging. I think that sometimes, as teachers, it's easy to get caught up in just "getting things done." Oftentimes, we don't allow ourselves any leeway to think creatively. How can we expect our students to be critical, divergent thinkers if we our not modeling that frame of mind in front of them?

Diane said...

During meeting two our group discussed using the Making Connections Potential Activities to help frame instructional activities. It provided an easy to use guide to help determine the various quadrants.

Eva said...

Meeting 2: Determining Rigor and relevance activity wasn't as clear as I thought it would be. The connections to learning activities sheet will help us plan for potential lessons.

SuzanneM said...

Session 2- I thought that the material in the "Making Connections" section of the handout is highly useful. It really breaks down activities that incorporate and explain higher/lower level strategies. Independence is one of the fundamental purposes of the educational system, which can only be achieved through pushing students to think at optimal levels.

Molly said...

Meeting 2- Concerning the Depth of Knowledge Levels and Rigor and Relevance Quadrants, I was excited about the potential activities in the "Making Connections" section of the handout. It was very helpful to see specific examples of how to apply these concepts in the classroom.

Brooke said...

Session 1 - Meeting 2
Wow! Although I strive to provide my students with "lifelike" real-world problem solvers every day, activities that I thought were DOK Level 3 (or even 4) are actually Level 2.

Diane said...

During meeting three all of our teachers presented a lesson. We discussed how Quadrant D lessons require much effort on the part of teachers, but the students maximize learning potential. Lessons learned from rigorous lessons are life long.

SuzanneM said...

Meeting 3- In 4th grade, we execute the Business Expo, which would fall into Quadrant D. This rigorous project demands a lot from each of the teachers, but we see its worth in our students. This is something that sticks with them for a lifetime, which essentially is the purpose of the Rigor/Relevance approach.

Eva said...

Meeting 3: I enjoyed hearing the thoughts and experiences each of us had taken away from the same activity. Our Business Expo Unit is powerful quad D experience for the BHCA students. Overwheleming for the teachers but worthwhile for the students.

Molly said...

Meeting 3- During this meeting, we had a lot of discussion about how planning and executing Quadrant D activities takes time and effort, but in the end is worthwhile. The activities from elementary school that I actually remember and apply today, are the ones that dealt with real-world problem solving, and would have fit into quadrant D.

Will Therrien said...

I really enjoyed the second video. I have never been a fan of treating children for ADHD and have always wondered,growing up, why it seemed that more and more kids have ADHD. We should be able to teach the way kids process information. That was a great "aha" moment. I have also never questioned kids going through school by age, and not by abilities. I plan on using the Rigor Matrix against my lessons to make sure I am getting the most out of the material I am teaching into the heads of my students.

Kelly said...

I enjoyed the video with all the pictures alot. It was very true about our students needing to reach those higher levels of thinking. School has become boring for a lot of students however until they have those basic foundations we cannot get them to the next level. Sometimes the basics are just boring. I love the idea of being able to teach everything outside of the box but realistically until our state tests that we are mandated to take get a complete overhaul we still have to make sure that the kids are learning some of those "boring" skills.

Kim Commander said...

I agree. There are many different ways to learn that allows children to continue creativity and the learning process.

Kim

Michelle said...
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Michelle said...

Daggett - We need to require students to perform at a higher level through more real world application of our content areas.
Sir Richard - We need more flexible learning environments to allow students with a variety of learning styles and talents to shine.
I thought of Shelby Lewis. Very bright, but bored in class therefore acts out. But if you give her a challenging task that involve creativity, she can handle it and will be focused. She also works well in a competitive environment. Not all of my lessons give Shelby what she needs, but I can do more of what she needs with each concept if I make the effort.

Rachel said...

I was very impressed by the video on schools killing creativity. I specifically remember him stating that (not in the same words)students who are tested gifted in kindergarten are not tested in the same capacity later on. This was intriguing to me. He also made me think how students are placed into grade levels, but maybe this is an inappropriate grouping. I enjoyed hearing another side of education and human development. It's always refreshing to hear new ideas.

Shana said...

I liked both videos. What really made me think was the comment about shutting senses off. This is something you feel is needed for the classroom setting, but at the same time is discouraging the true personality of the student. It is telling them that the person they are is not right for the institution? I want my classroom to be a place where students are encouraged to "wake up to what they have inside of themselves."

6th Grade Team said...

The 2nd video was very interesting. This teaching style needs to start in Kg. and carry throughout a student's school experience. If creativity is such a great idea, why did they take the short answer response off FCAT?

7th Grade Team said...

The videos and power points were most interesting and thought provoking. They certainly reminded us that if we only focus on assessments, teachers will miss the mark of why we are educating students. The education system has become so wrapped in testing that real teaching has often been forgotten. The creativity of children is smothered or extinguished by the pressure of test performance.
As stated, the assessment is the starting point, but it is definitely not the end. However, most training and personal development is about testing,
One of our team members questioned the success of the collaborative process for middle school students. We all agree that the profile of each class is often the determining factor in the success of a collaborative learning lesson.
As a team, we are discussing and questioning the purpose of our lessons; rigor and relevance are part of our goal. However, the most important goal is meeting each student at his/her ability level and fostering an atmosphere of creativity and pertinent instruction.

Jennifer C. said...

Couldn't agree more with Daggett's video that we have got to teach students how to take what they have learned and apply it to real life situations. I find that so many students don't want to think for themselves. If it's not a 'right there' question then it's easier for some to ask me for the answer. I can't help but think part of this is a fear of failure and it being reflected in their grade since parents have put so much emphasis on their children making straight As.
I also feel so short on time yet I would love to do more real world applications but find it's hard to squeeze it in. I think the extended projects in class would be great for students to reach the higher levels of learning. It's all I can do to get through the lessons!

Kelly said...

The Dagget video was quick and easy but hit the nail right on the head. We are all guilty of teaching level 1 and 2 learning. The problem is just as he pointed out, state tests are at level 1 and 2. Tests need to be changed in order for us to be able to change the ways we teach. I feel very time constricted with my groups trying to cram what they need to know vs what they want to know.
It is a great idea to believe that education might start making its way towards more freedom as teachers and students but is this truly a reality?????

Brittany W. said...

Meeting 2: I completely agree with the video. The lack of time we have with our students and the way tests are made to support only those lower levels makes it hard to really expose them to the higher levels that they actually need. The higher levels would really help them to understand more real world application and teach them to have the freedom to think beyond what is right there. Sometimes I feel like some of them don't really know how to think beyond because we aren't able to expose them to it as much as we would like to.

Trish said...

R. Webb: The video about schools killing creativity was incredible. I never really saw schools in that way but totally understand it now. After watching the video I tried an activity in class that required the students to use creativity. It was like pulling teeth- ten thousand questions, scared they were going to get it wrong, etc. It took a while and a lot of reassurance but they finally completed it. Some actually were comfortable with it while most simply were clueless. It is something I will definitely work on!

Denise said...

I think that creativity comes in many forms. Obviously, some kids are not made from the cookie cutter form that some school settings require. By allowing kids to be creative and encouraging that creativity, we allow kids to find their own focus and become even better thatn what they are good at. After 23 years of teaching I believe that true understanding (for levels 3-5)for most kids comes at a much later age than school age. I have seen kids flourish after high school who really struggled with the parameters that schools have put on them.

Kelly L. said...

It's SO true, isn't it? Sir Richard is absolutely correct about how we're killing creativity in our students. I found it very interesting about the ADHD and how reported cases are fewer and fewer as you move West. I also found it true that we must figure out WHY we're testing and HOW to use the results. If assessment drives instruction, then we definitely need to change our state-level instruction. How can we take students where they need to go if we don't get them where they need to be?

8th grade team said...

We had mixed feeling about the second video. We all agree that creativity is important and certainly lacking in many classrooms. The more state testing requirements we face, the more creativity will suffer.

Michaelqrji said...

I really enjoyed the videos. I agree that children need to master levels 1 & 2 then advance to levels 3 & 4. If not, they won't have the chance to think on that level.